#YearofYA Book Chat: George

It’s our 2nd #YearofYA Book Chat! If you missed our first one on An Ember in the Ashes, feel free to go check it out! A quick recap –

Our Book Chat has 4 sections:

  1. 30 Second Sell – where we book talk what we’ve read // feel free to use this section as a hook in your own classes to sell the book to YOUR readers
  2. Elaborate – where we dig deep into themes and what made us want to chat about this book specifically. If you have NOT read the book yet, you might want to skip over the “Elaborate” section as we discuss some details about the plot (but don’t give away the ending!!)
  3. Read Alikes – where we share other titles that are related to the theme, structure, etc that you might want to read or recommend to fans of the novel
  4. If you’ve read… answer this – where we pose a question and want YOU to participate in the conversation! Share your thoughts on Twitter using #YearofYA or comment on the blog.

Check out the #YearofYA Book Chat on: GEORGE!


If you’ve read… answer this:

  • Why do you think the author, Alex Gino, used Charlotte’s Web as the play in this novel?

 

Resources:

NYT Review by Tim Federle – it’s SO good

NPR Book Review

TPT Novel Study; endorsed by the author

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Teens Talk Tragedy: #YearofYA August 2016

When we sat down to discuss themes for our #YearofYA summer line-up, we knew we wanted to cover Pride month (even if it was a month late!), then Orlando happened. So immediately we decided there was a need to discuss tragedy from the perspective of teens, who are sure to be concerned about the violence they heard about in a club that was about embracing ALL and celebrating LOVE and LIFE through music. What a tragedy we thought… but then the news kept pouring in. PULSE… And Alton Sterling. And Philando Castille. And Dallas. And Baton Rouge. And Istanbul. And Nice.

I’m sure before this post goes live, we’ll have to add another And.

Tragedy isn’t new. Gun violence isn’t new. Discrimination isn’t new. But the 24-hour news and constant updates from social media means that we are fully aware of what’s happening around the world.

For so many teens, they experience tragedy on a less-public scale; no one will read their personal account or hear their audio bit on the national broadcast. Like other readers, my personal tragedies were validated through works of fiction; authors who were able to create a situation that was relatable and left me feeling less alone in my coping and healing.

So whether it’s a tragedy that would (or has) made the news, or something that’s far more personal, choose something this month that would help a student learn, cope, and heal. We don’t want to give too much guidance, because this looks different for every community, school, classroom, and student. Below are some ideas, but pick what fits for your needs.

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We will discuss on Wednesday, August 24 at 8pm EST. As always, tweet us using #YearofYA during the month, or drop your comments below.

Suggested Reading:

from Tavia: I’d like to suggest one book, which has had a place in my heart ever since I read it in 2015. All American Boys, by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely, tells the story of two teens, one black and one white, who are left to deal with the aftermath of a violent incident that divides not only their school and community, but also the country. Violence, whether terrorism, extrajudicial violent acts, school shootings, etc., permeates our culture and with every new tragedy I find myself thinking  enough is enough. In the wake of Alton Sterling and Philando Castille’s deaths, I turned back to the pages of this book for comfort and hope that things will get better and the next victim won’t be a friend, colleague or even one of my students.

from Mollee: I will be reading Tavia’s choice for August! One I recently read that I thought handled grief extremely appropriately and honestly was Tim Federle’s The Great American Whatever. Quinn, the main character, is reeling from a difficult loss while also experiencing every day, teenage challenges like applying for college (or not), first love, embracing his identity… but Federle’s voice maintains this undertone of hope — despite all that Quinn is sorting through (some of it, so so tough), there’s youthful optimism buried deep that life will find a way to go on. {But it’s not hoaxy!}

GoodReads Tragedy in YA List

SLJ Tragedy and Triumph in YA

Quirkbooks: YA that realistically depicts tragedy>> Short list, but I like the preamble to it

Aftermath: How YA Novels Deal With Shootings

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/2573.School_Shooting_Fiction

#YearofYA Book Chat : An Ember in the Ashes

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We’ve been working on a NEW feature for #YearofYA and after lots of chatting, writing, tweeting, and planning…. it’s finally ready to launch!

Our Book Chat has 4 sections:

  1. 30 Second Sell – where we book talk what we’ve read // feel free to use this section as a hook in your own classes to sell the book to YOUR readers
  2. Elaborate – where we dig deep into themes and what made us want to chat about this book specifically. If you have NOT read the book yet, you might want to skip over the “Elaborate” section as we discuss some details about the plot (but don’t give away the ending!!)
  3. Read Alikes – where we share other titles that are related to the theme, structure, etc that you might want to read or recommend to fans of the novel
  4. If you’ve read… answer this – where we pose a question and want YOU to participate in the conversation! Share your thoughts on Twitter using #YearofYA or comment on the blog.

As much as I love to write, we’ll let the video do the:

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Please make sure to tweet us about your thoughts using #YearofYA and/or commenting below! Remember, if you’ve READ An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir, add to this convo by answering our question at the end of the Book Chat!

 

Additional Resources about the book & Sabaa Tahir:

BEA video: From 2016 BookCon, where Sabaa talks about both Ember and its sequel, A Torch Against the Night

Huffington Post: Very personal, in-depth facts about how she was inspired to write this novel

Short Kirkus video: Sabaa answers some Qs about Ember

LOC National Book Festival Speech: Great speech; talks of her childhood at the 6min mark

Bookstacked: Interview about both Ember and its sequel, A Torch Against the Night

YAHighway:  great questions about the book and inspiration